Mason Faculty Publish New Books

Posted: October 19, 2005 at 1:00 am, Last Updated: November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

By Christopher Anzalone

Faculty members have recently published books on life’s origins, the interaction between black and Asian communities, modern physics, world opinion and American behavioral history. A synopsis of each follows.

Robert Hazen
Robert Hazen

Robert Hazen, Robinson Professor of Earth Sciences, examines the chemical origins of life and the complex processes involved in his new book, “Genesis: The Scientific Quest for Life’s Origins,” which was published by the Joseph Henry Press and the National Academies Press.

Hazel McFerson
Hazel McFerson

Hazel McFerson, associate professor of public and international affairs, edited “Blacks and Asians: Crossings, Conflict and Commonality,” to be published in December by the Carolina Academic Press. The book includes chapters written by scholars on the interaction between Asian and black communities in North America from the mid-18th century to the present day.

Robert Oerter
Robert Oerter

Robert Oerter, visiting assistant professor of physics and astronomy, had his book, “The Theory of Almost Everything: The Standard Model, the Unsung Triumph of Modern Physics,” published by Pearson Books. Oerter looks at the standard model of elementary particles, a theory that describes all known physical interactions. The theory’s historical background and its status in the present day are also examined.

Peter Stearns
Peter Stearns

Peter Stearns, provost and professor of history, had his new book, “Global Outrage: The Impact of World Opinion on Contemporary History,” published by Oneworld Publications. In the book he examines case studies of public opinion and the impact it has had on domestic and foreign policies during the last two centuries. He also edited a recently published book, “American Behavioral History” (NYU Press), which includes chapters by top scholars that examine patterns of behavior in American history and how past behavior can be used to interpret behavior today.

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