Highlights from the Faculty Authors Bookshelf

Posted: July 12, 2005 at 1:00 am, Last Updated: November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

By Megan McDonnell

Following are brief summaries of recent books written or edited by George Mason faculty.

Kenneth Button, director of the Center for Transportation Policy Operations and Logistics, School of Public Policy (SPP), edited Defining Aerospace Policy: Essays in Honor of Francis T. Hoban (Macmillian/Palgrave, 2004) along with Julianne Lammersen-Baum and Roger Stough, associate dean for research, development, and external relations and Northern Virginia Chair in Local Government in SPP. The essays offer a comprehensive look at the process of developing and implementing aerospace policy. The book is a practical guide for policy and decision makers in aerospace companies and government agencies involved in charting new directions for the nation’s aerospace policy. Francis Hoban, who died in 2002, was a senior fellow at SPP.

Desmond Dinan
Desmond Dinan

Desmond Dinan, Jean Monnet Professor and director of the International Commerce Program in the School of Public Policy, wrote Europe Recast (Macmillian/Palgrave, 2004). The book tells the story of European integration from its modern origins in the 1940s to the challenges of the new century. The book is organized chronologically, with each chapter covering a decade. A reviewer for the Times Higher Education Supplement commented, “A worthy addition to the still relatively few books covering the history of the European integration project. Useful as a set text for any chronologically structured course. It is also certain to become recommended background reading for anyone who wants a quick and not-too-dry introduction to the subject.”

Hassan Gomaa
Hassan Gomaa

Hassan Gomaa, chair and professor, Information and Software Engineering, wrote Designing Software Product Lines with UML: From Use Cases to Pattern-Based Software Architectures (Addison-Wesley, 2004). This book describes a new UML-based software design method for product lines called PLUS (Product Line UML-based Software engineering). PLUS provides a set of concepts and techniques to extend UML-based design methods and processes for single systems in a new dimension to address software product lines. Gomaa explores how each of the UML modeling views—use case, static, state machine, and interaction modeling—can be extended to address software product families. He also discusses how software architectural patterns can be used to develop a reusable component-based architecture for a product line and how to express this architecture as a UML platform-independent model that can then be mapped to a platform-specific model.

Kingsley Haynes, dean of the School of Public Policy (SPP), along with SPP Professor Kenneth Button and Professors David Hensher and Peter Stopher of the University of Sydney, has edited Handbook of Transport Geography and Spatial Systems (Elsevier, 2004). It is the fifth volume in a series of handbooks about the role that transport systems play in modern societies. Haynes notes, “This book is of critical importance due to the rapidly changing issues in geographic technology and their consequences for planning and management in transportation.”

Daniel Menascé, professor of computer science and director of the E-Center for E-Business, wrote Performance by Design: Computer Capacity Planning by Example (Prentice Hall, 2004). This book presents state-of-the-art quantitative techniques, supported by extensive numerical examples and exercises. Specific scenarios include: e-business, database services, web services, help-desk services, and data centers; techniques for identifying potential congestion at both software and hardware levels; performance engineering concepts and tools; detailed solution techniques including exact and approximate MVA and Markov Chains; and modeling of software contention, fork-and-join, high service time variability, blocking, and priority.

School of Public Policy Professor John Petersen’s latest book, Subnational Credit Markets in Developing Countries (University Press, 2004) was co-edited with Mila Freire. It examines the experience of subnational governments in accessing credit markets and how to realize the promises of credit market access while avoiding the pitfalls. The book focuses on 18 countries that are either attempting to attain more modern and productive economies or are moving from a highly centralized and large government sector to a more decentralized and market-based one. Petersen was the lead author on the framework chapters and contributed several of the case studies. The project grew out of initiatives undertaken by the World Bank and other bilateral and multilateral lending agencies to strengthen the financial and managerial capacities of local governments.

Windows on the World Economy: An Introduction to International Economics (South-Western, 2005) was written by Ken Reinert, associate professor in the School of Public Policy. The book introduces readers to the basic concepts of international trade, production, finance, and development, which are essential for operating in the modern global economy. In addition to being an economics professor, Reinert is also a professional international economist who works as a consultant to international economics organizations.

Catherine Rudder
Catherine Rudder

Catherine Rudder, associate dean of academic affairs and professor in the School of Public Policy, wrote The Politics of Taxing and Spending in Congress: Ideas, Strategy, and Policy. It appears in part four of Dodd and Oppenheimer’s Congress Reconsidered (CQ Press, 2004). In addition to Dodd and Oppenheimer’s assessment of the 2004 elections, contributions reflect original scholarship, place new developments within a broader historical perspective, and consider the future direction of Congress.

Entrepreneurship and Regional Economic Development (Edward Elgar, 2004) was edited by Roger Stough, associate dean for research, development, and external relations and Northern Virginia Chair in Local Government in the School of Public Policy, along with Henri L.F. de Groot and Peter Nijkamp. The book examines an often overlooked perspective for operating a business in a global economy: the geographic, or spatial, element of entrepreneurial activity. The text examines the relationship between the spatial aspects of entrepreneurship and economics. It is a collection of new contributions from scholars in the field of endogenous growth and new economic geography literature.

Susan Tolchin
Susan Tolchin

Public Policy Professor Susan Tolchin’s book, Glass Houses: Congressional Ethics and the Politics of Venom (Westview Press, 2004), was written with her husband, journalist Martin Tolchin. In it, the two show how ethics in Washington have changed over two centuries while offering new interpretations of past ethics cases, from McCarthyism to the “Keating 5” to the investigations of Sen. Robert Torricelli. The Tolchins focus most of their attention on the years since 1974, when many new ethics laws were passed after Watergate, and especially on the years since 1994, when Newt Gingrich became Speaker of the House of Representatives. During this period, the Tolchins argue, notions of corruption expanded enormously. The standard practice of one generation became criminal to the next. “Mores are changing,” says Susan Tolchin. “In the 19th century, it was ethical to shoot someone in a duel. Now that’s obviously not ethical, and we’re examining what is.”

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