Mason Faculty Publishes New Books

Posted: December 9, 2004 at 1:00 am, Last Updated: November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

Several members of the George Mason faculty have new books in print. Following is a brief summary:

Richard Bausch
Richard Bausch

Richard Bausch, Heritage Chair in Writing, has a new book called Wives and Lovers, a collection of three novellas, which was published by Perennial (HarperCollins) in July 2004. Requisite Kindness, the only of the novellas to be published for the first time, tells the story of a man who must come to terms with a life of treating women badly when he goes to live with his sister and dying mother. Rare and Endangered Species demonstrates how a wife and mother’s suicide reverberates in the small community where she lived, and affects the lives of people who don’t even know her. Finally, Spirits is about the pain that men and women can—and do—inflict upon each other. These three very different works illuminate the unadorned core of love—not the showy, more celebrated sort but what remains when lust, jealousy, and passion have been stripped away. Bausch is a recent winner of the PEN/Malamud Award for short fiction.

Marc Gopin
Marc Gopin

Marc Gopin, James H. Laue Chair in World Religions, Diplomacy, and Conflict Resolution in the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, has a new book called Healing the Heart of Conflict: Eight Crucial Steps to Making Peace with Yourself and Others recently published by Rodale. In the book, Gopin shares what he has learned from working for peace in sticky world trouble spots such as the Middle East and Northern Ireland: that some conflicts, rooted in the deepest, most primal emotions, cannot be solved by traditional discussion and negotiation. Instead, the answer lies along a path of self-examination and spiritual growth. Gopin details a process that will help people free themselves from the soul-poisoning effects of destructive conflict. The eight steps teach the reader how to examine his or her inner life so that character becomes a true ally of healing, to pay close attention to the power of one’s own emotions and those of others in conflict, to understand the dynamics of difficult situations, to imagine creative solutions that no one else dared see, and to take powerful action that completely transforms hopeless situations.

Carol Mattusch
Carol Mattusch

Carol Mattusch, Mathy Professor of Art History, wrote The Villa dei Papiri at Herculaneum: Life and Afterlife of a Sculpture Collection, which is published by the J. Paul Getty Museum and will be released in January 2005. The Villa dei Papiri at Herculaneum was buried when Mt. Vesuvius erupted in A.D. 79, and was rediscovered in 1750. The villa contained a large collection of bronze and marble statuary and busts, and before they were exhibited, the sculptures were restored to appear whole. The resulting collection helped to shape early modern tastes in classical sculpture. Mattusch’s book describes the nature of the ancient sculptures and their impact on the modern public. She also presents a technical study of the production techniques and materials used to make the sculptures, as well as their modern restoration history. Scientific analyses and detailed photographs reveal how the pieces were cast and pieced together in antiquity and how they were restored in the 18th century.

Daniele Struppa
Daniele Struppa

Daniele Struppa, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, co-wrote a textbook titled Analysis of Dirac Systems and Computational Algebra, which was published by Birkhauser in 2004. It is part of a series called Progress in Mathematical Physics. The book addresses the work of Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, a scholar who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1933 after finding a connection between relativity and quantum mechanics that became known as the spin-1/2 Dirac equation. The term “computational” in the title emphasizes two main features of the book, namely, the heuristic use of computers to discover results in some particular cases, and the application of Gröbner bases as a primary theoretical tool. Knowledge from different fields of mathematics, such as commutative algebra, Gröbner bases, sheaf theory, cohomology, topological vector spaces, and generalized functions (distributions and hyperfunctions), is required of the reader. The book is written for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, math physicists, and computer scientists.

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