January Accolades

Posted: January 6, 2003 at 1:00 am, Last Updated: November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

Accolades is a monthly column recognizing the latest achievements of George Mason faculty and staff members. Submit Accolades information by the 15th of the month preceding to Attn: Daily Gazette, by mail to 4C5, by fax to (703) 993-8784, or by e-mail to gazette@gmu.edu. Electronic photos with submissions are welcome.

Administration

Ian Art King, Diversity Programs and Services, received the Bobby Leach Award, which recognizes a professional who has contributed significantly to the development of multicultural relations on a college or university campus. The Southern Association for College Student Affairs presented the award at their 53rd annual conference in Biloxi, Mississippi.

Photo of Peter Stearns

Peter Stearns

Peter Stearns, provost, gave the keynote address at a Harvard School of Public Health conference on Rethinking Addiction held in Las Vegas.

College of Arts and Sciences

Don Boileau, Communication, presented three papers at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans: “Students’ Reaction to the First Day of Class: Effectiveness in the Communication Classroom;” “Graduate Education for Community College and Administrators: What Should it Comprise?” and “Communication in Action: A Tribute to William Work.”

Timothy Conlan, Public and International Affairs, presented a report on “Going Global: The International Activities of State Legislatures,” at the Council of State Governments’ 2002 Annual State Trends and Leadership Forum in Richmond. The report summarized research sponsored by the Council of State Governments and the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Tai Du, Communication, presented “The Influence of Passion, Instruction, Repetition, and Feedback in Fostering Communication Expertise Across the Curriculum (CXC): A Testable Model for Outcome and Assessment in Higher Education” at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans.

Andrew Finn, Communication, presented “The Dynamics of Learning Teams in the Large Classroom” at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans in November.

Sheryl Friedley and Bruce Manchester, Communication, presented “You’ve Come a Long Way, Baby–NOT: Strategies for Promoting Gender Equality in Intercollegiate Forensics” at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans.

Carol Litchfield, Biology, was elected a fellow in the Society of Industrial Microbiology, only the fifth woman in the society’s history to receive this designation. Litchfield serves on the society’s board of directors. She also is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and serves on the editorial boards of Microbial Ecology, Bioremediation Journal, and Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology.

Cynthia Lont, Communication, presented “Students: Opportunities and Challenges” at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans

Katherine Rowan, Communication, presented “When Simple Language Fails: Cancer Risk Communication Across the Life Span” and “The Influence of Passion, Instruction, Repetition, and Feedback in Fostering Communication Expertise Across the Curriculum (CXC): A Testable Model for Outcome and Assessment in Higher Education.” Rowan also offered a course titled “Risk Communication” at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans.

Paul Siegel, Communication, presented “Voices of Dissent: The Action and Inaction of Unpopular Opinions After September 11;” “Free Expression: A ‘Free’ Action of Communication;” and “Product Placement and the Law” at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans.

Lisa Sparks, Communication Department, presented six papers at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans: “Moving Beyond the College Sophomore: Innovative Approaches to Gathering Data from the Community and Naturalistic Settings;” “When Simple Language Fails: Cancer Risk Communication Across the Life Span;” “Social Identity and Health: An Intergroup Communication Approach to Cancer;” “The Status of Undergraduate Life-Span Instruction in the United States: A Preliminary Report;” “Students’ Reaction to the First Day of Class: Effectiveness in the Communication Classroom;” and “Communication Satisfaction in the Consumer-Provider Relationship: An Intergenerational Comparison.” Sparks was awarded Top Three Papers in Communication and Aging at the conference.

Photo of Anita Taylor

Anita Taylor

Anita Taylor, Communication, presented “Roundtable on Issues Affecting Women in Communication Administration” and “Graduate Education for Community College Faculty and Administrators: What Should it Comprise?” at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans.

Susan Tomasovic, Communication, presented “Communication in Action: Students’ Response” at the National Communication Association Conference in New Orleans.

Graduate School of Education

Susan Burns received a Significant Achievement Award for a therapeutic preschool she developed with her colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh. The award was from the American Psychiatric Association “in recognition of outstanding innovations in the integration of early childhood mental health services for low-income children in an inclusive daycare setting.”

Nada Dabbagh wrote an article, “Assessing Complex Problem-Solving Skills and Knowledge Assembly Using Web-Based Hypermedia Design,” which was published in the Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia, Vol. 11(4). She has been elected to the Board of Directors of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, which provides an international forum for the exchange and dissemination of ideas among those actively involved in the designing of instruction and a systematic approach to learning.

Joe Maxwell’s keynote address to an international conference on qualitative psychology last October has been published as “Realism and the Roles of the Researcher in Qualitative Psychology” in The Role of the Researcher in Qualitative Psychology, edited by M. Kiegelmann and published by Ingeborg Huber Verlag, Tübingen, Germany.

Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution

Photo of Terrence Lyons

Terrence Lyons

Terrence Lyons presented “Failed and Failing States: Demilitarizing Politics and Reconstituting Political Authority,” at the U.S. Agency for International Development’s annual Democracy and Governance Partners Conference. Lyons’ address was part of a plenary panel that examined the policy environment surrounding the key challenges in preventing or reconstructing failed and failing states.

Robinson Professors

Robert Hazen, Robinson Professor of Earth Sciences, presented five lectures on the origin of life at: the Learning in Retirement Institute; Lafayette College, Pennsylvania; LaSalle University, Pennsylvania; Washington University, Missouri; Southern Illinois University; and the University of Missouri-Kansas City. Hazen also played trumpet in the orchestra giving the world premiere performance of Thomas Beveridge’s Symphony of Peace.

Hugh Heclo, Robinson Professor of Public Affairs, gave a lecture on “Religion Re-enters American Politics: A Critical Assessment,” at Fordham University’s Forum on American Politics.

Harold Morowitz, Robinson Professor of Biology and Natural Philosophy, gave a lecture on “Phenetics, a Born-Again Science,” at the National Institutes of Health conference on The Dynamic and Energetic Basis of Health and Aging. Morowitz also presented “Scientific Perspectives on Emergence and Divine Immanence: How the Word Became Flesh,” at Metropolitan Memorial United Methodist Church.

Photo of Roger Wilkins

Roger Wilkins

Roger Wilkins, Robinson Professor of History and American Culture, wrote an article, “What Patriotism Means Today in the Wake of 9/11/2001,” that was published in Social Education 66 (6). Wilkins also gave the keynote address, “Civil and Human Rights in the 21st Century,” at the annual meeting of the Princeton branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Defense Fund; and he gave a lecture on “Thomas Jefferson and the Contemporary Scene,” at the Chicago Festival for the Humanities. In addition, he gave an address on “Civil Rights in the 21st Century,” at the Master’s Dinner, Silliman College at Yale University; and spoke in honor of Brian Lamb, who received 2002 Fourth Estate Award at the National Press Club. Wilkins was appointed to the National Commission to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Brown vs. Board of Education Decision.

School of Computational Sciences

James Kinter was appointed to serve as chairperson of the National Science Foundation (NSF), Division of Atmospheric Sciences, steering committee on cyberinfrastructure, which is charged with producing a report on how the NSF should invest in cyberinfrastructure research and operations.

School of Information Technology and Engineering

Kathryn Laskey, Systems Engineering and Operations Research, joined the Board of Mathematical Sciences and Applications of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), and is leading a subcommittee focused on homeland security issues. She will be working with the board to identify sponsors within the government for NAS studies of issues related to homeland security.

School of Public Policy

Stephen Fuller was appointed to the National Association of Industrial and Office Properties (NAIOP) Distinguished Fellows for 2003. Selection is based on an individual’s contribution to the field through research and educational achievements.

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