New Books from Faculty Authors

February 19, 2010Print-Friendly Version


By Robin Herron

Following is a selection of books recently written or edited by members of the Mason faculty.

Tomasz Arciszewski, Civil, Environmental and Infrastructure Engineering, published his new book, “Successful Education: How to Educate Creative Engineers” (Successful Education, LLC, Dec. 2009). The book discusses methods of effective engineering education in college departments, using historical principles and practices. Arciszewski explains why this education must undergo an evolution and how it can do so.

David C. Rine, Professor Emeritus of Computer Science, edited with Ghazi I. Alkhatib “Web Engineering Advancements and Trends: Building Dimensions of Information Technology” (IGI Global, 2010). The book examines integrated approaches in new dimensions of social and organizational knowledge sharing, with an emphasis on intelligent and personalized access.

Jay Shiver, Health Administration and Policy, edited with David Eitel “Optimizing Emergency Department Throughput: Operations Management Solutions for Health Care Decision Makers” (CRC Press, 2009). The book focuses on providing health care leaders with the tools they can employ to optimize the performance of emergency departments and thereby improve service to patients, employees and communities.

Suzanne Smith, History and Art History, has written “To Serve the Living: Funeral Directors and the African American Way of Death” (Harvard University Press, 2010). Her book discusses African American funeral directors, who were historically among the few black individuals who were economically independent. She explains how their financial freedom gave them the ability to support the struggle for civil rights as well as bury the dead.

Smith and her book were featured on the Virginia Public Radio show “With Good Reason” as part of a segment titled “No Argument Here: Reviving Debate at Historically Black Colleges.”

Frank Whittington, Global and Community Health, edited “The International Handbook on Aging” third edition  (Praeger, 2009) with Erdman Palmore and Suzanne Kunkel. The handbook responds to the United Nations World Assembly on Aging’s call for advancing health and well-being into old age by detailing what researchers worldwide are doing to answer that call.

Dave Williams, English, has written “Searching for God in the Sixties” (University of Delaware Press, 2010), which he describes as “an outgrowth of my English 202 course on the ‘60s here at Mason.”

The book jacket blurb says the “…book dares to rethink the whole of the ’60s experience, not from a political or sociological, but from a historical/theological perspective.”

Martin Winkler, Modern and Classical Languages, is the editor of “The Fall of the Roman Empire: Film and History” (Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), which presents essays relating to the film, “The Fall of the Roman Empire” from historical, historiographical  and cinematic perspectives. The book also provides the principal classical sources on the period. It is a companion to other Winkler edited books, “Gladiator: Film and History” (Blackwell, 2004) and “Spartacus: Film and History” (Blackwell, 2007), and completes a triad of scholarly studies on Hollywood’s greatest films about Roman history.

Have a new book out? Send information to gazette@gmu.edu.


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