Dear Mr. President: Mason Experts Offer Education Policy Advice to Incoming Administration

Posted: October 2, 2008 at 1:00 am, Last Updated: November 30, -0001 at 12:00 am

In a weekly series running from now until the election, the Mason Gazette will present the views of expert Mason faculty on various important campaign issues. This week’s focus is on education and education policy.

By Jennifer Edgerly

Penelope Earley

Professor, College of Education and Human Development

Director, Center for Education Policy

Penelope Earley
Penelope Earley

“We entered the 21st century with a school system designed to serve the United States in the 1900s. Consequently, education policy options often are merely attempts to patch a system that worked before World War I, but aren’t addressing needs in 2008 and into the future. There are only so many times you can repair a Model-T.”

Prior to joining the Mason faculty, Earley was a vice president at the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE) in Washington, D.C. At AACTE her responsibilities included federal and state governmental relations, policy analysis and gender equity.

In 2001, she received the Martha J. Fields Award of Excellence from the National Association of State Directors of Special Education.

Gary Galluzzo

Professor, College of Education and Human Development

Coordinator, Teaching and Teacher Education Program

Gary Galluzzo
Gary Galluzzo

“There is a growing concern about standardized tests and the power those tests have in determining the options available to students. Low scores on these tests can prevail over a teacher’s grade in a course and can trigger a series of consequences, many of which may not be warranted.

“As No Child Left Behind comes up for reauthorization, it would be useful to take a good, hard look at whether state testing systems are accomplishing what they were intended to accomplish.”

Galluzzo served on the Board of Directors of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and the Board of Directors of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE).

He was a member of the AACTE Research and Information Committee, which conducted eight annual national studies of teacher education and published the monograph series, “Teaching Teachers: Facts and Figures,” known as the Research about Teacher Education Project.

His research includes investigations into how students become teachers, curriculum reform in teacher education, program evaluation in teacher education and education reform.

Donna Sterling

Professor, College of Education and Human Development

Director, Center for Restructuring Education in Science and Technology

Donna Sterling
Donna Sterling

“Voters are concerned with low performing schools and our nation’s growing need for skilled scientists and engineers, especially the impact this could have on our economy and lifestyle.

“The rapid change of pace in the global economy and workplace increases the need for workers with knowledge and skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics at the technical as well as professional levels.

“For our country to be a leader among nations, science, technology, engineering and mathematics education needs to be valued and supported throughout schooling, from kindergarten through graduate school.”

Sterling works with Mason’s science and mathematics faculty to investigate research-based effective teaching and learning, and she has extensive experience in designing, directing and evaluating science education programs.

She has received research funding from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Carnegie Institute of Washington, Dominion Virginia Power, National Science Foundation, State Council of Higher Education for Virginia and the Virginia Department of Education.

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